Corns Not Planted and Need To Switch Your Hybrid? Read This Before You Do That!



So we are approaching Memorial Day weekend and you haven't been able to plant your corn yet. Many thoughts are probably running through your head like - Will it ever stop raining? Should I be considering switching hybrids to a shorter day maturity? Here is some information that might help you when making the hybrid maturity descision.

Late planting of corn can tend to influence maturity decisions as our season continues to get delayed. There are many things to consider when weighing your options. First to consider is the 10-14-day weather outlook this will give us an idea if we are going to have the option to get into the fields. Second would be to look at the hybrids you have selected and determine their respective GDD units needed to reach silking and physiological maturity. As stated in Bob Nielson’s article that you can read HERE, “Based on research we conducted some years ago, hybrids planted later than about May 1 mature approximately 6.8 fewer GDD’s for every day of delay beyond May 1, through at least the 2ndweek of June .... For example, a hybrid rated at 2700 GDDs from planting to physiological maturity (kernel black layer) and planted on May 31 reaches physiological maturity in less than 2500 GDDs after planting (e.g. 2700 – (30 days X 6.8)).”  Using this information decisions can be made to plant your current full season hybrids or shorten up the maturity. As discussed on Mike on Monday this week (Which can be found HERE), the Midwest Regional Climate Center has developed a tool to help model the upcoming growing season. This tool can be found HERE. Based upon historical data the model determines when a specified maturity of corn will reach the critical stages of silking and black layer. With this being said, I would encourage growers to consider this information and use this tool in making planting decisions as we continue into our delayed spring. 

Chris Reichert
Agronomist, CCA